Babies, Baby, Birth, Cesarean, Children, degenerative disc disease, Disability, Family, fibromyalgia, hEDS, Hypermobility, My Life, Pregnancy, Surgery

I’m Back. With A New Addition

So, it’s been a while.  Pregnancy wasn’t easy for me, so blogging fell by the wayside as working took all my energy.  I had a brief respite in the second trimester, then in the 3rd I developed awful SPD and ended up barely able to walk.  For this reason, I was induced at 34 week +4.

Abby at 21 weeks gestation

((Warning: Descriptions of birth, surgery and complications below))

I went in to hospital on the 24th February, and the induction was inserted at 12.30pm. I had a little tightening over the next few hours, but at 6pm things ramped up big time. With my hEDS and fibromyalgia I was finding it all very painful, but it became clear that I wasn’t actually in labour. It was a very long night.

At 12.30pm the next day I was finally in active labour, so I was taken down to delivery. I was waiting for an epidural, but the anaesthetist was called away to an emergency, so I didn’t get one for a few hours more. I’ve experienced serious pain with my conditions, but have to say that I was in the worst pain ever. My waters broke by themselves, spectacularly (seemingly I was carrying a lot of water). Eventually, I got my epidural, and everything was going as planned. I was dilating, and baby was doing well. Until I wasn’t dilating any more, and my baby was showing signs of distress. I stopped dilating at 7cm, and the baby was not in a position suitable for any form of vaginal delivery. So emergency c-section it was. My daughter, Abigail arrived at 7.12pm and was 7lb 5oz. We got back up to the maternity ward and all seemed good. I mean, the next afternoon I was on Reddit and Facebook. I was in pain, but that was to be expected.

First sign something wasn’t right with me was my heart rate started rising. Blood tests showed I was quite anaemic due to losing blood during my section, so I was given iron tablets. By Tuesday evening my heart rate was stupidly fast, and another blood test showed my haemoglobin levels had tanked and 1am Wednesday morning I was rushed for a blood transfusion. It was hoped that would be it, but nope. The transfusion worked wonders for my red blood cell count, but by now I’d developed a high temperature and my heart rate was just as high as it had been. Time for yet another blood test, and my infection markers were sky high. I’d also developed an Ileus, and was suffering excruciating stomach pain. So now it’s IV antibiotics and fluids time. All this whilst trying to look after Abby. Don’t get me wrong, the midwives were amazing at did so much to help me with her, but I wanted to do as much as I could for her.

I don’t remember much about Wednesday or Thursday, but I know by Thursday evening they were seriously worried about me. I didn’t realise how ill I actually was. I felt awful because my infection meant Abby needed IV antibiotics too, and she’d developed jaundice (her bilirubin levels were ok, she didn’t need treatment for it).

Thankfully Thursday night marked the turning point in my condition, and by Friday morning my temperature started to drop, my heart rate slowed and the infection markers in my blood were falling. The Ileus also worked itself out, so I wasn’t in so much pain.

I was allowed home on Saturday, albeit with a sackful of medication and follow-up appointments. The antibiotics made me sick, but fortunately I had a very supportive husband who helped me look after myself and Abby.

I’ve ended up formula feeding Abby, despite planning to breastfeed her. Trying to learn how to breastfeed whilst so ill has had a hell of an affect on me, and I’ve found it too traumatic to try to start again. I’m dealing with feeling I’ve failed Abby. I’ve also found some people have been very judgemental about my choice, but I’ve learned to ignore them.

So yeah, it was not the experience I expected, but Abby is totally worth it.

 

She’s now 5 weeks, and is growing like a weed! She’s starting to smile and is very alert, which is great but she has a habit of being too curious to sleep. I’m getting used to the sleep deprivation. She’s also no longer yellow, so she doesn’t look like a Simpsons cast member.

Disability, fibromyalgia, Hypermobility, Mobility Issues, My Life, Theme Parks

Do I Risk it or Don’t I

I’ve been a rollercoaster junkie ever since I first went on the Tower of Terror at the now defunct Camelot theme park in Lancashire, England back when I was a mere 10 year old.

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Now this takes me back…

Since then I have been to many a theme park here in the UK. Frontierland Morecambe Alton Towers, Thorpe Park, Chessington World of Adventures, Flamingo Land, and a few others I’ve probably forgotten.  The closest Theme Park to me now is Blackpool Pleasure Beach, which I have visited many a time.  My mum has never forgiven me for the time we were on the Log Flume there, when I was up front, and at the last second on the way down the main drop I ducked down so she got a face full of water.  And then there is Valhalla, a Viking themed water ride, where the sign says ‘You May Get Wet on this Ride’, and that turned out to be a total understatement and I took a few hours to dry out.

It’s been a few years since I last went to a theme park, and recently I have seen a videos of Blackpool Pleasure Beaches newest rollercoaster.  It’s my 38th birthday on the 4th June, and I thought that maybe a day out at Blackpool would be a perfect way to celebrate.  Until G pointed out that breaking too hard in the car throws my back into spasm.  So maaaaaaybe it’s not the best idea.  I guess I’ll never know until I try, but when the cost of trying is at best painful and at worst, absolute agony whilst I’m laid up for a few weeks, I guess I have to be sensible.

However being sensible has never been my strong point.  We shall see.

Interestingly enough, an Urban Explorer got into the abandoned Camelot theme park a few years ago.  It’s sad to see the place I spent many a happy day in during my childhood like this, but also quite interesting.

degenerative disc disease, Disability, fibromyalgia, Hypermobility

“You Must Be Feeling SOOOOOO Much Better In This Weather!!”

It’s been the hottest day of the year in some parts of Britain today.  I’m not sure whether this has been the case in Lancaster, UK, where I have spent most of today, but it certainly felt like it to me.

Today I have been to a wedding, which was very nice (I wish my sister in law and her husband all the best).  It’s been a lovely day, the sun is shining, there isn’t a cloud in the sky… But I’m sat here praying for a thunderstorm.

People automatically assume that people with illnesses like mine suffer during cold weather, and feel better in warm weather.  But this isn’t always the case.  I love winter.  Cold weather doesn’t affect me, and up until I started using a walking stick, I loved snow.  In hot weather, I feel like death warmed up.  I can’t control my temperature, and I hurt all over.  At least when it’s cold you can put more on.  there is only so much I can take off to keep cool before I get arrested for indecent exposure and trust me, you do not want to see that.   Right now, I am

a) Praying for a thunderstorm

or

b) Wanting to emigrate to the Arctic Circle

The next person who says I must be feeling better in this hot weather better be able to out run me (tbh it’s not hard).

Now please excuse me whilst I go and find a chest freezer to lie in.

degenerative disc disease, Disability, fibromyalgia, Hypermobility, Mobility Issues, My Life

Things About Having Chronic Illness That Can Be Worse Than The Illness.

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1 – The Well Meaning Person That Ends Up Mortified

There is an older lady in my local charity shop that has been there for years. I don’t know her name, but she’s always been nice and chatty whenever I go in. I lived in a different village for a while, so I didn’t get over often and she’s not seen me much until I moved back to my home town six months ago. I’ve used a walking stick for a while now, but she hadn’t seen me regularly for a long while, and yesterday, when I went to see if I could find any bargains, she asked me if my ‘injury’ would take much longer to heal. And that’s when my heart sank, and I have to do one of the worst things to do with my disability.

Continue reading “Things About Having Chronic Illness That Can Be Worse Than The Illness.”

Caving, degenerative disc disease, Disability, fibromyalgia, Hypermobility, Mobility Issues, Yorkshire

What a Difference 6 Years Makes

I’m not sure about other people, but I kind of enjoy the Facebook Memories thing that pops up each day to show you what you posted about on the day since you joined.  Sometimes it’s funny, sometimes I find I cringe a bit about what I’d posted, and very occasionally it makes me kind of sad.

This photo appeared in my memories today.

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Continue reading “What a Difference 6 Years Makes”